intrude

intrude, obtrude, interlope, butt in are comparable when meaning to thrust oneself or something in without invitation or authorization.
Intrude both transitively and intransitively carries a strong implication of forcing someone or something in without leave, without right, or against the will of others; it often connotes rudeness, officiousness, or invasion of another's property, time, or personal privacy
{

this court always had disavowed the right to intrude its judgment upon questions of policy or morals— Justice Holmes

}
{

Sergeant Lumley, unfairly intruding his official superiority into this theological discussion— Sayers

}
{

I stood there, feeling very abashed at intruding on all these busy people— Mannix

}
Obtrude in this relation retains much of its basic notion of pushing or extending something into view; it may imply nothing beyond this fact
{

I intended plain prose, but a rhyme obtruded itself and I became poetical— Cowper

}
or it may suggest the impropriety and objectionableness of the act or the disagreeableness of the offense
{

the first sin against style as against good manners is to obtrude or exploit personality— Quiller-Couch

}
Interlope implies an interposition of oneself in a place or position which has an injurious effect on one or both of the persons or things concerned
{

he regarded her new acquaintance as an interloping rival for her hand

}
{

he dealt with the Communists as a Groton football coach with a bunch of interloping ruffians who don't know the rules of the game— Time

}
Butt in implies an abrupt or offensive intrusion suggestive of the manner in which a horned animal attacks its enemy ; in this sense the term usually suggests absence of ceremony, a sense of propriety, or decent restraint
{

it's a thankless job to butt in and tell a man that in your important opinion his wife is a vampire bat— Sinclair Lewis

}
{

he left behind a big, white turkey gobbler. It would butt in when we fed the horses and was a general nuisance— Siberts

}
Analogous words: *trespass, invade, encroach, entrench, infringe: inteiject, interpose, insinuate, interpolate, intercalate, introduce: interfere, intervene, interpose: *meddle, intermeddle, interfere, tamper
Antonyms: stand off
Contrasted words: withdraw, retire (see GO): retreat, *recede

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Intrude — In*trude , v. i. [L. intrudere, intrusum; pref. in in + trudere to thrust, akin to E. threat. See {Threat}.] To thrust one s self in; to come or go in without invitation, permission, or welcome; to encroach; to trespass; as, to intrude on… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Intrude — In*trude , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Intruded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Intruding}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To thrust or force (something) in or upon; especially, to force (one s self) in without leave or welcome; as, to intrude one s presence into a conference;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intrude — [in tro͞od′] vt. intruded, intruding [L intrudere < in , in + trudere, to thrust, push: see THREAT] 1. to push or force (something in or upon) 2. to force (oneself or one s thoughts) upon others without being asked or welcomed 3. Geol. to… …   English World dictionary

  • intrude — in·trude /in trüd/ vb in·trud·ed, in·trud·ing vi 1: to enter by intrusion 2: encroach a search that intrude s on a person s privacy vt …   Law dictionary

  • intrude — (v.) early 15c., back formation from intrusion, or else from L. intrudere to thrust in (see INTRUSION (Cf. intrusion)). Related: Intruded; intruding …   Etymology dictionary

  • intrude — [v] trespass, interrupt barge in, bother, butt in*, chisel in*, cut in, disturb, encroach, entrench, go beyond, hold up, horn in*, infringe, insinuate, intercalate, interfere, interject, interlope, intermeddle, interpolate, interpose, introduce,… …   New thesaurus

  • intrude — ► VERB 1) come into a place or situation where one is unwelcome or uninvited. 2) introduce into or enter with adverse effect. 3) Geology (of igneous rock) be forced or thrust into (a pre existing formation). ORIGIN Latin intrudere, from trudere… …   English terms dictionary

  • intrude — UK [ɪnˈtruːd] / US [ɪnˈtrud] verb [intransitive] Word forms intrude : present tense I/you/we/they intrude he/she/it intrudes present participle intruding past tense intruded past participle intruded 1) to become involved in a situation in a way… …   English dictionary

  • intrude — v. 1) (D; intr.) to intrude into 2) (D; intr.) to intrude on, upon (to intrude on smb. s privacy) * * * [ɪn truːd] upon (to intrude on smb. s privacy) (D; intr.) to intrude into (D; intr.) toon …   Combinatory dictionary

  • intrude — in|trude [ınˈtru:d] v [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: intrudere, from trudere [i] to push ] 1.) to interrupt someone or become involved in their private affairs in an annoying and unwanted way ▪ Would I be intruding if I came with you? intrude …   Dictionary of contemporary English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.